Mailfaux – A Review

Malifaux

Well actually it should technically be Malifaux 2nd edition – a review but who wants to get bogged down in semantics? So this review has probably been a long time coming, especially as I can’t resist a skirmish game and it must be said that with so many great games out there we did sort of let the 1st edition rules pass us by. That said good things come to those who wait and when Phil dropped the rule book off to me I wasn’t disappointed.

rules

So for those of you that don’t know, Malifaux is a skirmish game designed by Wyrd Miniatures for 32mm scale models. If you are anything like me then I am sure you are saying nothing new there (because I know I did). However that reaction was short-lived. The game, like many others, is based on an alternative version of Earth and is heavily focused on magic, but describes itself as a collection of Gothic, Steampunk and Victorian Horror with a dose of the Wild west thrown in. Now I’m sure you will agree that is quite a combination and makes for a game with a fairly unique feel.

With this mish-mash of genres the game has a really diverse background and brings with it some very unique factions and given Wyrd almost unlimited possibilities when designing the characters for each. This has resulted in some great miniatures and some really likeable characters that I am looking forward to collecting.

Mal img 1

Perhaps likeable is the wrong word…Mal img 2 Mal img 3 Mal img 4

For Malifaux 2.0, Wyrd has increased the number of factions so there are now 7 to choose from and with each one being very different. It means there is almost definitely a faction for every brand of mayhem. Wyrd have also been clever as there are different groups within each faction meaning that you can even take the same faction in several different directions.

With such an original background to get excited about I was initially surprised when the premise of the game was quite so standard. A city in ruins begins to be repopulated and opposing factions are fighting for territory and resources (in this case Soulstones). For any Mordheim player (or for that matter any skirmish gamer), this is nothing new. But don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that is a bad thing. There is a simple reason why so many games use this formula…because it is fun and it works. What Wyrd have done well with Malifaux is thinking up a variety of scenarios to play, including a lot of character driven stories, that will keep things fresh. And I must say some of them sound quite cinematic, which I always like.

So onto the book itself, I am pleased to say that my first impressions were positive. The print quality is pretty good and the book doesn’t feel cheap, which is one of my biggest gripes with some other gaming around, especially when you consider the price you are expected to pay for them. Considering the variety of styles Malifaux incorporates, most of the artwork has done a really good job of capturing the feel of the Malifaux universe and life through the breach.

The book is set out in a logical way which makes sense to read, taking you first on a journey through the background. There are a lot of great stories, setting the scene for each faction and some of their main characters which helped me decide which faction was for me. It also gives you all the profiles and rules you need for each faction so there is no need to buy a separate army book which is always a win. But it’s a two-edged sword as background can be sacrificed on the altar of page limits.

Wyrd have split the Malifaux rules into 3 parts, starting with the basics then going into more depth on the game’s core mechanics and then working examples of all elements of a turn within the game. Examples are well explained and although more diagrams could be useful, it seems that Wyrd have fine-tuned their explanations since version 1 as most of them are very clear. This methodical approach will hopefully prevent a lot of aimless flicking through the book for the one rule you really need but can’t find.

The game has some quite unique game mechanics that make it feel different to others with the biggest difference being that Malifaux doesn’t use any dice. At all. Instead you use a fate deck based on a standard poker deck, and if I’m honest I am not 100% sure of how I feel about this. Call it naivety or delusion but I always feel as if I have some influence over a random dice roll whereas with a card deck you know you will only ever score four 13’s and you are quite likely to score four 1’s. It certainly is an interesting way of ensuring a levelling the playing field, that is unless you want to cheat fate. Once I had read the rules I was interested to see that Wyrd have added a way to cheat fate by allowing you to have a small hand of fate cards you can choose to play instead of drawing from the main fate deck.

fate

The rules seem to work well and make for a very enjoyable game or short campaign, especially if you play one of the character driven story lines but there does seem to be one factor that other skirmish games may do better and that is character development. Malifaux hasn’t completely neglected this as they have included some faction specific upgrades that can be purchased for characters. Whilst this does help to slightly improve your characters I’m not entirely sure it will be enough to really get you attached to you heroes as they develop new skills or issues which is something that Mordheim, for example, really excels at. This could only really prove to be a real issue in long-term campaigns and certainly doesn’t stop it being really enjoyable for one-off games, or short campaigns and it is definitely a game I can’t wait to play more.

The Malifaux 2nd edition rule book is available at Firestorm Games priced £25.19.

– Neil

Dreadball: Azure Forest – A Review

For some of you who have read previous articles on the site, you may already be well aware of this, but if you don’t already know; I love Dreadball! I genuinely do have a real fondness of Dreadball for a variety of reasons, with the most notable being the scoring system, the varied tactics created by different player positions and teams, plus the general carnage. Recently a few people have said to me “It is just like Bloodbowl” and to these people I say: you obviously haven’t actually played it. Anyway putting this loved up rant to one side, Dreadball is now firmly one of my favourite games, so when I heard that Mantic were releasing the Galactic Tour Series to be played alongside Season 3, I was obviously very excited, but also a little worried, as I have seen other games do similar things with underwhelming results.

The concept behind the Galactic Tour Series is a simple one, with the popularity of Dreadball growing throughout the Corporation, more leagues are appearing on some of the stranger planets on the further reaches of Corporation space. With these new leagues, there are some new rules and some slightly… less safe stadium designs to play in. With the first of the series; Azure Forest now available, it was inevitably going to be one of my first purchases at Salute this year. I am pleased to say that now I have played a game in Azure Forest, I am sold, it’s still Dreadball that I know and love but having to play through harsh weather conditions and earthquakes can at times really change the game and your tactics.

Dreadball Azure Forest

So what do you get in the box? Azure Forest comes with a weather table as the weather will change throughout the match, which creates some real tactical challenges. Being unable to dash, reducing the range and accuracy of throws and, possibly the toughest of all; heat wave, which tires all players out and reduces them to using just 1 action token a turn can both be found in the dekc. As I mentioned before these additions can be genuine game changers and will change the way you use your team. Plus the fact that the weather changes randomly will really keep you on your toes and I can testify to the fact that this makes the game a lot more exciting and guarantees that no two league games will play out the same way.

You also get a brand new MVP – A’Teo Adysi – who comes with a nice back story and is from a race called the Ynjdi. A new species for Dreadball one must ask if they’re a team for further down the road. He has a nice set of stats and special skills, and without seeming overpowered, looks like he could mix it with some of the better players. Interestingly  A’Teo is a metal figure which is a real change for Mantic and, on his occasion, it is one for the better. Because he is metal, there is great detail on the model, probably better than on any of the plastic figures they have released so far. Also unlike some metal models, I am also pleased to say that my A’Teo came with little to no flash on it.

Ateo Adysi

Another nice touch with the Azure Forest set is that it comes with its own trophy. Granted it is a bit of a novelty and not really necessary at all, but as I said its a nice idea and its metal too. Again, just like the MVP there is a good level of detail on it and it looks like it will be fun (and quick) to paint.

trophy

In Azure Forest it is not just the weather that you need to be prepared for as Mantic have added another nice element. You also get 15 new game cards to be shuffled into the main game deck. They are marked differently on one side which is a nice touch so the don’t look any different face down but they can be easily separated from the deck. Just like the weather, the new cards have been designed for maximum carnage. Earthquakes, creatures falling out of the rainforest canopy onto the pitch, and a nasty bout of jungle sickness (that just so happened to affect my striker who was carrying the ball) all feature. The new event is really quite fun and a little more chaos that although it won’t change a whole game, can make or break a rush.

Finally you also get the 32 page rule book, but unlike all the main Season rule books it is A5 not the regular A4. This however makes for a well thought out and add yet more challenges to playing in the Azure Forest. A couple that cropped up in my first game were an very little difference as it is still well put together. As well as the stats for A’Teo, it also contains profiles and start for 3 other MVPs now available to buy and some nice background about the Blue Moon and the Azure Forest league. It also covers revised tournament rules to play a specific league, and if you do Mantic has also written some nice rules for blessings from the town elders that you can buy to temporarily improve a player. The rules do feel a little light and there is possibly too much background, but it is a good read and with all the other bits you get I am almost certainly being too picky. I’m sold.

Azure Forest Book

So all in all, Azure Forest is a great stand alone supplement and it adds some extra spice to any tournament or league, and is well worth giving a go. More exciting than that is  it’s only the first of the Galactic Tour series and it is a strong start. I can’t wait to see what planet and what challenges the Galactic Tour will throw up next. If you are as intrigued as I was then the last point to mention is the price.

The box is less than £15 and can be bought on Firestorm Games for £13.49 which seems pretty good value, especially when most other games would charge you £15 just for the cool new metal special character or the rules but certainly not both or with the other extras too.

Salute in Review: Dreadball Fest!

Salute 2014

Salute, salute, salute salute salute. (sung to the tune of Black Adder) I’m sure no one minded me singing Rob’s Salute theme tune on the way home one little bit. In fact it probably made the trip back from London go even quicker [Especially as it took four hours thanks to Mat’s atrocious SatNav – Ed.]. So I am sorry to say that it is over for another year and with 365(ish) days to go until the next Salute, I am going to have to go back to buying models in shops or online like the rest of the world. Oh the horror! The whole event was great and there was some awesome stuff to see: so much variety (which is a great sign for the hobby in general), so many great people to meet and I know even though I spent the whole day trying to see everything I probably only got to see half of what Salute had to offer.

The day went pretty much to plan, with no help from Forge World. They had everything a Warhammer 40k player could want…as long as you wanted something from the Horus Heresy. However as an Ork player I was disappointed to find out that they had brought none of their awesome Ork range so I had to order the heavy weapons I needed for my Battle wagon conversion. I hope they turn up soon. Needless to say I have learnt my lesson and next year I will be ordering in advance, still at least I didn’t have to pay the postage and packaging.

Zzappa

But then I wondered over to the Mantic stand…Not only did I got a great look at their Battlezones range (watch this space), but I also got some really exciting information about Dreadball Xtreme and Deadzone and how new rules will work and I am now more excited about both games than ever. I’ll be covering that in more detail soon. Then I bought a lot of stuff for Dreadball including the new supplement Azure Forest. Review to follow. [Damn Neil, you’re gonna be busy. -Ed.] We’ve also made it on to Mantic’s reviewer list so we should be able to cover their products much more thoroughly in the future.

I also confirmed that I have definitely fallen in love with Malifaux and saw some amazing figures from Twisted, Black Scorpion, Taban and Mierce miniatures. I checked out some of the great scenery from Amera Plastic Mouldings, where I picked up a great amphitheatre piece and still regret not picking up another Dreadball Stadium, especially as by the end of the show they had them for £25! I was also really interested by a range I had not come across before – Z Clipz by Studio Miniatures.

Amphitheatre

So onto the spoils, and like I said I did buy a lot of Dreadball. I picked up booster squads for both my human and robot teams, as well as two hard-hitting MVPs Buzzcut and DRB7 Firewall and the Azure Forest supplement. Away from Dreadball I got some red dice (because red ones roll higher – it’s science), and a the aforementioned Ork Big Zzappa.

Firewall Buzzcut

Human booster

dice

It wasn’t the biggest haul I know but it was what I wanted and regrettably all I had time to get the rest of my day was meeting some of the #warmongers at the meet up, watching the mild-mannered Mat turn into a model buying machine and the rest of the day was business, meeting some great companies and talking about their new projects and The Shell Case. It should make for some great articles over the next few months.

Dreadball Chromium Chargers – A Review

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When Phil asked me to join The Shell Case team he did so saying that I could look after the Dreadball content seeing as I’m a bit mental for it. Oh how he’ll rue the day… If for no other reason I find myself reviewing the Chromium Charges and I know how much he, and most of the other team members, wanted to get their hands on them.

The Chromium Chargers are a team of robots built by some very bored scientists who wanted to see how good a Dreadball player can be, and backed by some large Corporations, keen to show off their newest robotics which can transform at will into whatever type of player the situation calls for. Now, transforming robots aren’t the most original idea for anyone that has owned a TV or been to a cinema over the last 30 years but, but let’s be honest it’s fun and therefore it’s a good one. And as they say “if an idea ain’t broke, don’t fix it”. From a manager’s point of view the way the team works is certainly interesting; having an entire team of Jacks and changing their role throughout the game can lead to a very different and reactive style of play compared to other teams.

Chromium-Chargers-Robot-TeamThe Chromium Chargers box contains 10 models – 6 Jacks, 2 Strikers and 2 Guards, and whilst this is more figures than other teams get, [Unless you count the mispacks. -Ed] it actually only gives you 6 playable figures as all have to start as Jacks, but with the Chargers 6 is all you should need. Like all of the main teams it would be well worth picking up the team expansion as unfortunately all 6 Jacks come in the same pose. That said it is one of the better poses Mantic have done and I am pleased to say the same can be said for the Strikers as they are really dynamic and the Guards do look like they could dish out some damage. Plus with a whole team costing less than £15 it is hard to be anything but positive about them.

The Chargers have been designed really well and with a high level of detail on each one, they do genuinely look cool. They are a much better design than I would have imagined; sleek, thin and they look like they would be mobile and capable of moving at pace. Mantic have done well managing to make the robots look as though they were built for sport without looking so solid that other races would just bounce off of them. This is important in making the models appear believably competitive but not invincible. I am also pleased that Mantic were also able to make the transformations look like they actually work and the great looking diagrams in the Season 2 rulebook helps to support this further.

The models were also surprisingly easy to build, and this is coming from someone who is very much about the gaming first and the hobby second. Just like all the Season 2 teams, there was far less flash on the models to contend with than the Season 1 range. This made the building process a lot quicker and a whole lot more enjoyable, plus with each model being made up of only 3 parts, it further speeds things up but obviously limits your ability to make the figures in any way individual without conversions.

Once the Chargers were built, I couldn’t wait to get them on to the neodurium [Neeeeeerd! – Ed.] and see how they played, and the fact is the team plays really well. The team has the all-round qualities you would expect to find in the human teams but their ability to transform them gives them a real feeling of flexibility. At the start of a game your team is obviously slightly hampered by having only Jacks and you will feel like you are missing out on the big tackles and tough shots, but with the Quick Change Artist special rule that will swiftly change. There is something extremely satisfying about watching an opponent’s face as without warning two of your players transform into guards and smash a hole through their line then a second pair change into strikers steal the ball unchallenged and score to take the lead.

Despite this once you have played that one obvious tactic, throughout a whole game they are not always the easiest easy to play with and the Chromium Chargers do pose a truly enjoyable challenge to use. They would suit a gamer who is tactically aware as it is vitally important that you always have the right mix of players on the pitch for each situation that comes up and that you conserve some actions for changes at vital times. They are a great addition to the Dreadball Universe and are fun to play both with and against.

The Chromium Chargers are available from Firestorm Games priced £13.49. This team requires the Season 2 expansion book available from Firestorm Games priced £8.99.

The Shell Case does Salute – Neil

Salute 2014

As the 12th April comes ever closer and the prospect of another day filled with nothing but the sights, sounds and smells of the UK’s best all-round gaming show (and with the recent trend with Games Day, arguably just the outright best) fills our every waking thought (especially Mat’s – it’s his first time and he’s really quite excited), the members of The Shell Case team attending Salute this year (sorry Ashley, next time maybe?) have taken time to reflect on their hopes and expectations for Salute 2014.

And now to Neil to wax lyrical:

Neil

So it’s that time of year once again and with just over a week to go, I couldn’t be more excited about Salute 2014… that is unless I was Mat, but first times are always more special. Last year was great and so this will be a tough act to follow, but as always Salute has attracted a lot of great companies and I’m sure it will be awesome.

That said, this time last year I had just fallen hard harder than is comfortable for Dreadball and as a result a lot of my day was spent looking at all the brand new and mega exciting stuff that Mantic had to offer me, nearly emptying my bank account in the process. This year however, unlike Rob, for the first time ever I am going to Salute with no real plan at all. For the first time in a long time I am really not in need of anything major for any of my armies, and although there are some great games out there, I am tight and I’m yet to come across a new game that is getting me hot and hard enough to part with my cash. However with all the great new stuff companies usually bring I’m pretty sure that will very quickly change.

There are however a few things that will definitely be on my to do list;

1. Just enjoy spending the day with the rest of The Shell Case guys and the chaps. It’s sickening I know but a day with them is always a laugh.

2. Hopefully meet some of you at the #warmongers gathering and checking out some of your best buys.

3. I always have room for a new Dreadball MVP or 3, and maybe a new team. One using season 3 rules would be very cool.

4. With all the shiny around, I’m sure it will be almost impossible to resist buying at least one new game. I have been toying with Malifaux and In Her Majesty’s Name from Osprey.

Once I am there, I will suddenly find a million extra awesome but unnecessary things to buy to add to my Orks, Prussians or Banebrood. So, you know, it’ll be Salute.

Mantic Battlezones Announced

MTC-FullLogo-3

Mantic are back with another release but this time it isn’t a new team for Dreadball!

They are instead launching their new futuristic scenery range: Battlezones which they are saying will allow you to easily build a truly 3D gaming space at a genuinely affordable price. If this is the case then I am very interested as the first pictures suggest that these kits could be great for a lot of games.

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The Urban Quadrant

From what Mantic have said so far Battlezones will be marketed as high quality plastic kits that will be modular so can be built and put together in a virtually infinite number of ways. Looking at these initial pictures, it looks like the range will be suitable not only to add cover to a large board but also to create some interesting looking claustrophobic close quarter battlefields ideal for skirmish games.

Titan-1-272x485

We will keep an eye open for any more news on this, and their timing couldn’t be better with Salute 2014 just around the corner. I am looking forward to seeing the finished product, and needless to say I will paying Mantic a visit on the day to see what they are showcasing.

Avengers: Age of Ultron Character Art Released

Avengers

A brief pause from the usual toy solider related awesomeness for a little bit of Avengers awesomeness.

If anyone enjoyed the Avengers film as much as I did, excluding Phil who I’m pretty sure still watches that movie every couple of week, [What’s your point? -Ed], then you may be interested in this.

Joss Whedon has confirmed the team we know and love will be joined by the brother and sister duo of super fast Quicksilver and psychic Scarlet Witch.

Quicksilver

They have released concept art for both characters who will be teaming up with Iron Man, Captain America and the gang in the next film, Avengers: Age of Ultron.

Scarlet Witch

It goes without saying that we’ll have a team outing to see it. I can’t wait, even if it isn’t out until 2015.

Orks: Coping with an Outdated Codex

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I first started playing 40k when third edition came out. Phil had convinced my Dad to get into it and I shortly followed. I made a vague attempt to collect Imperial Guard but they weren’t for me, despite the awesome old metal models. They felt too structured. Too…sensible. I fell out of love with 40k for a while after, before a couple of years ago Jeremy gave me the Ork contents of the 5th edition 40k boxset as a birthday present. Phil followed that up with a copy of the Codex. And so began my journey collecting an army with the same level of finesse and sophistication as me…As a collector of Orks I am happy to say, without any prejudice what-so-ever, that it doesn’t matter what army you collect and what species they are: I hate them.

The answer to why this is, quite simple; it is partially because its fun to hate every other army, it makes them easier to kill, but mostly down to jealousy. I’m jealous of your guns, technology, your ballistic skill, reliability and your initiative. So why bother collecting Orks? Well they are just so different. It’s not just their great background and their rules but it is the general character of the whole army. You can guarantee that even if you play the same way every time, no two games will ever play out the same.

6th_Edition_Codex_Orks

However, considering they are an army with such great variety, for the Orks, nothing has changed in a very long time and this is making it harder and harder for them to remain a competitive force. I know they are not the only army still waiting on a new 6th edition codex, and I know their current book is very well written (which is probably why it has survived all of the games rule changes over the years), but the fact of the matter is the Orks have not had a new codex since the 4th edition of Warhammer 40,000 way back in 2007. For the last 2 editions of the game I have seen other armies getting shiny new guns, units and some brilliantly devastating new rules and this leads me back to the whole jealousy thing.

A week or so ago I agreed to play a new member of our group using Phil’s Ultramarines, using the new Codex: Space Marines and 6th edition rules. As far as the armies in the Warhammer 40K universe go, I have always reserved my most bitter animosity for the Space Marines. I have always felt that as cool as they look and their background is, they are the 40k Universe’s equivalent of that guy we all knew at school who never put any effort in but passes every test, always wins and as well as this, somehow gets the girl… Not that the Space Marines have any desire or need for such things. They are in fact the kind of army that make me want to run full speed across the battlefield towards them, shouting at the top of my lungs, and hit them hard in the face with something quite sharp or heavy (or both). Luckily for me this has always been the most effective way of winning, especially as an Ork will usually find that even in Power Armour, if you hit them hard enough (and enough times), they are just as squishy as anyone else.

Orks 02

When preparing for the battle it was plain to see that on paper, just as they always have, the two forces look completely unbalanced with the Orks seeming to be completely out matched. The Marines can shoot further and far more accurately and even their base guns will ignore most Ork Armour, so there is no point in getting into a prolonged gun battle with them. The Space Marines are also as strong and as tough as most Orks and most importantly they are far less likely to run away. This of course poses a problem as unlike most other armies, even if you beat them in combat they are not going anywhere. To remedy this I plumbed the extensive green skin archives and consulted with some of the finest Ork tacticians, to come up with an almost fool-proof plan.

The plan was an old one but a classic. Overwhelm your opponent with sheer weight of numbers and grind them down. Then combine this with getting to them fast, or better yet very fast. Revolutionary! Granted it’s not the most elegant of plans but this is Orks not Eldar, and I have always found in the 5th edition of 40K that when in doubt this has proven to be the only way to really go toe-to-toe with and stand a chance of beating Space Marines.

I took large mobs of Boyz, some fast troops like Storm Boyz, Deff Koptas  and some trucks, plus a few special troops to deal with the inevitable well armoured tanks. Killa Kans and Tank Bustas specifically. I then ensured that set up my army in a good Waargh! formation; a wide line mixing fast vehicles in amongst the mobs to make sure I could hit his line in 2 waves. It got off to a good start as I lost fewer casualties than expected to gunfire and got my first units to the Space marine lines within 2 turns, but that is where the 6th edition changes made a difference and it all went wrong.

army10

(Some of the currently unpainted Waargh!)

army11

Warbosses and Nobs are now more vulnerable than ever, as instant kills have to be double the target’s toughness, not more than double. This is a game changer, as there are a good number of strength 10 weapons a space marine force can take. When I finally made it into combat I came across the next game changer. Furious charge is no longer as effective as it used to be. And the new overwatch rule means that some of the edge has been blunted from an Ork charge. Granted hitting on 6’s does limit the risk but rapid-firing boltguns will mean on average two Ork boys will drop. Seeing as you take from the front that can make the difference between a charge being successful and not. Which makes deployment, how you move mobs through the space and how you and when you choose to attack your targets more important than ever.

Don’t get me wrong, Orks do still dish out plenty of pain but the rule changes impact noticeably. Overwatch has the potential, given enough fire power and enough luck, to render your charge impotent. Which kinda sucks considering the assault phase is my thing. Between those changes and stuff like initiative being used  to determine whether or not a defeated unit runs, and a new Space Marine Codex, means that I’m going to have to go back to the drawing board.

The new Ork Codex can’t come soon enough and you better believe I’ll be getting it day of release and Believe me when I say I am looking forward to the new codex and I hope to be reviewing some great new rules or stat changes to level up the playing field a bit.

New Teams for Dreadball Announced

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It’s fair to say that things over at Mantic are moving at a frenetic pace, so here’s hoping that we can keep up. They have just released their first ever non Kickstarter backed supplement; Galactic Tour Series: Azure Forest, which Mantic have hinted will be the first of many. Their focus has now firmly shifted back to Kickstarter where it all began and the launch of Dreadball Xtreme. Having now exceeded their pledge goal, Mantic have 2 extra teams to unlock early as part of Dreadball Season 6. They have released initial concept art for both teams and they look like they will pose very different challenges to the existing teams.

Introducing the Koris, a bunch of aliens from another dimension with a real grudge against the Asterians.

Portal-Spinner-Guard

They are a team with a real bad attitude and access to some awesome looking technology, which early reports suggest will not only allow them to teleport across the arena like the Teratons, but in an interesting twist also warp opposition players out of the way or even off the board entirely. This could open the door to some great new tactics and could make the Koris a nightmare to play against.

The second team Mantic will be launching are the Hobgoblins. Of all the possible species and types of alien from the infinite number of galaxies they could have chosen I am a little surprised they went with this one, but we’ll give them a go.

Hobgoblin-Team

There is very little information out about them at the moment other than the fact that their guards are quite literally the Hulk. With Hobgoblin and the Hulk maybe this is the perfect team for Marvel fans.

Hobgoblin-Team1

At first glance, based on the pictures, the models should look good. There is an argument they could be mistaken for another version of the Marauder team, however the addition of strikers should make them very different to play with.

I’m looking forwards to seeing the finished models and giving these teams a go.

There’s 48 hours left of the Kickstarter. If you feel like pledging then go here.