Warhammer 40,000 – Coping with Change

So most of us have had 8th edition for a little while now and have likely invested in an Index or two.

Aside from ditching the 3rd edition mechanic almost entirely which has served as a rebirth for a number of weapons and tactics,  there has been a conscious effort to redress the balance for certain armies. Armies that, no matter how hard the design studio tried, were consistently mugged off by every codex that came out for them.

The main victims were the Imperial Guard, Tyranids and Orks who for years never quite lived up to the potential, despite a consistent top up of new and groovy models. Arguably Eldar and Dark Eldar occupied the other slots in the ‘Top 5 Most Mugged Off Armies’ chart but they are less of a focus.

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Speed

One of the biggest changes from 7th to 8th edition was reintroducing different move rates. Back in 1998 I actually really liked the change because it made things simpler and made the game feel faster.

Back then it probably did play faster too but as the years and the editions wore on more and more special rules had to be introduced to cope with the dizzying array of faster units, including flyers the game introduced.

It became clumsy, awkward and completely deballed the argument for having flat movement values in the first place. So they’ve gone.

This is extremely good news for Eldar armies but it’s utterly terrifying for another fighting Tyranids. Because by the Emperor’s shrivelled nut sack are they quick.

Whilst the majority may shrug because they should be, it blows all army compositions and battle plans that rely on gun lines clear out of the water. Some units under 8th edition can more or less assault on turn 1. That’s 2nd edition levels of crazy and I love it.

This is the 41st Millennium after all where either insanely advanced tech, unholy powers of the Immaterium or super fast, super agile alien life forms exist. Of course shit should move that fast.

Those who relied on whittling down enemy units with shooting and then weathering the inevitable assault with superior stats need to think again because you no longer have that kind of time.

For Guard players the change in movement coupled with the move towards treating vehicles like infantry has turned the Leman Russ variants into hilarious and incredibly hard to kill, fast-moving flanking units as opposed to the armoured pill boxes of yesteryear.

Survival

As if blinding speed wasn’t bad enough, the flimsy base units aren’t so flimsy any more. With the change of AP from a value weapons can ignore to a modifier – ala 2nd Edition – Imperial Guard, Hormagaunts and Ork Boys all get a save against most basic weapons.

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This is a major change because up to now mobs of Orks could be culled with almost impunity by Space Marines unless the Ork players coughed up for the ‘Ard Boy upgrade. Which, again, completely undermined a big advantage for fielding Orks: numbers.

The same was true for Imperial Guard. Take Grenadiers or storm troopers or be prepared for a very static game.

Whilst standing still and shooting (or attempting to) everything that moves is a tried and tested tactic of the Imperial Guard, it doesn’t take long for that way of playing to get old.

With how modifiers work: Tyranids, Orks and Imperial Guard become a lot more dynamic. Of course leapfrogging form one building to another will still keep your blokes alive for longer because of the +1 to armour save, but they now stand a fighting chance when they’re forced to run across open ground too.

It’s hard to say who benefits the more from this as all of the flimsier armies benefits. The only armies who don’t are the Space Marine derived. But on the upside they get a more gripping game.

Power

In 8th edition a lot of things got a lot more power from units to weapons.

The move to flat rolls over tables means that Orks, who have suffered for years with a statline that never really reflected the sheer brutality of the army, are now horrendous.

Broadly speaking 8th edition favours horde armies over any other but Tyranids and Orks definitely come out on top.

The durability when combined with higher to hit and wound rolls have turned the lowly Ork boy in to a combat monster. Whilst I’m of the opinion this is a positive and needed to happen, a lot of gamers are about to get smacked around by opponents that historically posed no real threat.

Orks are now fucking mental.

Anyone who read my review of the core rules will start to see that the apple cart his so much been upset as been shelled from space.

But it goes further than that. Guard’s traditional utter mediocrity is no completely offset by the fact that everything can wound everything.

Whilst you’re unlikely to lose a Land Raider to concentrated lasgun fire, it is now possible.

But for the Imperial Guard it isn’t just the fact that infantry units are now incredibly worthwhile, it’s the sheer variety of special and heavy weapons you can cram into the army.

For example Plasma weapons have always been handy but now they are more or less the go to ‘everything killer’. Although there are more powerful weapons out there, point for point – especially as the plasma gun is as destructive as a plasma cannon – they can tackle most things.

A plasma gun and a plasma pistol in every squad and suddenly you have units that can overwhelm small elite units and chip away at medium and light tanks with ease.

Brace, Brace, Brace!

Whilst Space Marines make out okay in 8th edition, not least because of the addition of Primaris marines, it’s the horde armies that are the ones to watch. Especially with the introduction of power levels.

Asymmetric gaming overwhelmingly benefits horde armies simply because they get the most pop for their points. If you’re using the Open War deck (which everyone should because it’s awesome) then you can be in for some really fun and very messy games.

Of course the real prize-fight will be seeing one horde army face off against another. Especially Orks vs Tyranids. Speed and aggression vs savagery and unrelenting toughness.

 

Ork Gorkanaut – A Review

warhammer-40000-logoThis review is later than planned because my daughter selfishly got sick and meant all my evenings were spent caring for her instead of building the Gorkanaut. I’ve still not finished it but I’m far enough along that I can confidently review it.

It’s awesome.

Review over.

Gorkanaut_MorkanautAs if! My opinions can never be confined to two words.

Just for the benefit of those that have been living in an Ork free cave for the last few months, the Gorkanaut/Morkanaut is the latest big kit to roll off the production line bring the Green Menace up to snuff with the Imperium, Tau and Eldar. And like the Imperial Knight there are options to build one of two types of big clanky architects of destruction.

Whilst I plan on having both variants in my Freebooter’s army I kicked things off with the Gorkanaut because it’s my favourite of the two. The only real difference is the primary weapon and the absence of the Kustom Forcefield. And a less mekky head.

The kit has needed instructions. There’s a lot of parts and some of them need to keep moving after the gluing and it wouldn’t take much to get that wrong without the guidance from the below par diagrams. And between the below par diagrams and the sheer volume of cool bits and bobs to add it takes a good long while to build the kit. If you’re planning on using it the day you buy it, start early.

It’s brilliant fun to build though. The kit strikes the balance between strength and posibility perfectly aside from the legs being a little static, but it’s forgivable considering the design of the model and the inevitable limitations. But there are options enough you can mix it up a bit. Plus if you’ve bought any other Ork vehicles there’s no shortage of odds and sods to really make it feel individual. Which is just as well if you’re planning on having more than one of these bad boys in your army. And why wouldn’t you?

The detail on the kit is awesome. The bulkheads have that rough and uneven feel of something that’s been hand-made which, of course, they would be. And the areas around the legs and feet have wearing from the legs being poorly designed and made which, of course, they would be.

The hard points and the weapons design means you can build either configuration without the need of lots of spare and wasteful plastic. It also affords some subtle variation as well as conversion opportunities. The big shootas would also look awesome slapped across the wings of Dakkajets for anyone wanting to really tool up their flyers.

There are lots of little touches to the kit that imply real thought on behalf of the Meks albeit none of it terribly clever. Like the mud guards by the leg and the fact it kinda looks like a Mek got carried away trying to build a suit of Terminator armour. It is a poor man’s Stompa in many ways though, in the same way that a Killa Kan is a poor man’s Deff Dred. It’s not a gripe as such but it does lack the same gravitas or the same degree of crudity to its construction. But it will still look badass on the board. Until you buy a Stompa. And for the difference in money you kinda have to ask yourself why you’d opt for the Gorkanaut.

But truth be told it’s an excellent kit in its own right and whilst the Gorkanaut’s big brother is the cooler and better value option it’s also the less practical one. And you can field two Gorkanauts for the points.

In game terms it’s typically Orky in its application. Volumes of dice from a big shooty weapon, in the case of the Gorkanaut, that will miss more than it hits, and a claw to tear open…well, everything. And it’s needed. The fact that it’s armour is 13 to the front and side is pretty amazing for Orks but it’ll still be vulnerable through sheer weight of fire and most armies having vastly superior anti-tank. So for the points it’s a gamble as you’ll be forced to send it stomping across the board in the hope of it making its points back.

The Morkanaut more so for me. Whilst it’s Kustom Forcefield affords it durability – which is handy considering the small transport capacity – but it’s single shot weapon will be useless 4 times out of 6. And even then the kustom mega-blasta lacks the punch to be major threat to heavily armoured vehicles like Leman Russ or Land Raiders. Instead it’s far better put to use crippling APCs and support vehicles forcing the enemy out into the open where the rest of the Ork army can wade in. The claw is for the big meaty stuff. But even then don’t hinge your game plan on it.

Annoyingly the support weapons will probably be more use considering how likely either ‘Naut is to get mobbed by nasty choppy units.. Especially on the Morkanaut as it lacks the anti-personnel potency of the Gorkanaut to thin the herd.

But it’s an Ork vehicle and Ork players have come to expect very little from their army so anything that does come off is a bonus. And in the mean time they have a very cool model on the board that looks scary and might draw some fire for a couple of turns. And maybe, just maybe, it may take something down with it. If it doesn’t just console yourself with the fact that it was immense fun to build and looks awesome.

The Gorkanaut kit is available from Firestorm Games priced £55.25

Fast Movers in 40k

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Last Thursday I got a game of 40k in using my new Ork army. As it was their second outing I thought I’d mix it up a bit and give the Dakkajet a try because, well it’s freaking cool. For reasons passing my understanding, I told Lee I’d be taking a flyer which prompted him to tweak his army list to cram in a Strom Raven. I can’t blame him, I just wanted to be a sod and spend all game strafing him with impunity.

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I was my usual jammy self and managed to get my Dakkajet on the board at the start of turn 2 and immediately set about hosing down an Imperial Guard squad. The Storm Raven came on the following turn and turned the sky around my Dakkajet into a swirling storm of explosions and hot lead in an attempt to turn the Howlin Git into a big cloud of tin foil and fire. But as I mentioned, I was jammy. Passing 6 out of the 7 Jink saves forced upon me resulted in me breaking off and attacking a second Guard section with the Raven in hot pursuit. The Dakkajet’s number as inevitably up but it struck me how (a) cinematic it all looked (b) how flyers didn’t break the game as I feared and (c) how introducing flyers is a natural evolution in army selection and encourages gamers to take ‘all comers’ lists rather than tailoring them to suit a specific force or army composition.

Lee had a tactical advantage in so much as I’d told him I was taking a flyer. However ‘best practice’ as it were suggests that he should allow for that likelihood anyway. With pretty much every army having a flyer of some sort it’s reasonable for us as gamers to have a contingency to deal with them should we find the sky filling up with fast movers. Units with skyfire rules or an upgrade or ammo type. A flyer of your own is not unreasonable and if it turns out your opponent hasn’t taken one then you get to dominate the skies. It’s not exactly a lose lose situation other than the often heavy point investment required. Or you make the decision to ignore it and hope for the best. Having witnessed what my piddly Ork flyer can do I don’t necessarily recommend that option. A flyer will rarely win you the game, but it will give your opponent a headache whilst the rest of your army does the business.

But the point is this: Flyers were an important missing piece of the 40k puzzle. I was quite possibly the biggest sceptic (well joint first with Lee) when they first started to appear in 40k. It was a combination of things as to why. Firstly it was how simply flyers worked in Space Marine – that was never going to translate well in the creaking behemoth that is the 40k rule book. Secondly, the rules seemed reminiscent of Epic 40k. Which was such a wallowing turd of a game I was immediately concerned. And finally my feeling was that they would unbalance the game and give Space Marines, Chaos Space Marines and Necrons an insurmountable edge.

Whilst the latter is partially true it re-emphasises the point that 40k is at its best when armies are interesting. Built around combined arms rather than designing a power list to spank the living shit out of your opponent in three turns or less. And then hit on their momma. Solid cores of troops, elite units, assault elements, armour, artillery. All working together to the greatest effect. Add in aircraft and it all suddenly makes sense. It adds an extra layer to the combat, adds a new threat to the previously tame skies. It forces gamers to think in three dimensions beyond vantage points in buildings.

Plus it’s outrageous amounts of fun. Building the kits is awesome. It takes those early days of building Airfix F14 super Tomcats to a whole new (and way cooler) level. And using them is ace. They look great on the board, the rules make for new and interesting tactical decisions for both players. And board set up too has never been more important. Playing hideously open boards that have no place being anywhere other than Warhammer Fantasy or Lord of the Rings will spell doom and misery for any units that fall under the guns of a flyer. But I suppose that could make for interesting scenarios too and allow you to recreate the odd scene from the Gaunt’s Ghosts series. No bad thing there.

In short – flyers have changed the game of 40k far more than I ever realised, and for the better. The potential for aerial shenanigans encourages gamers to write more flexible army lists. Tactics have to be rethought and adapted. The space has never been more three-dimensional and board layout is vital to affording your troops the protection they’ll need. It doesn’t mean flyers are overpowered because they’re not. They’ll still get shot to bits by one another and even without skyfire, it’s not as hard as you’d think to shoot something down, because I’ve done it. Of course there’s a commercial argument. If you have a flyer I have to buy one too. Little bit of yes, little bit of no. No one forces you to do anything and there are alternatives. But I struggle to entertain the financial point of view because chances are we’ve already spent a couple of hundred pounds on our armies already. What’s another thirty? Flyers represent an opportunity to bring some of the excitement, dynamism and scale from the artwork to the board. And that cannot be a bad thing.

-Phil

Warhammer 40,000: Regicide

So another Warhammer 40,000 game is in production. This time it’s 40k Chess. To be honest I have no feelings one way or the other on how good or not it will be. Or even how advisable it is to make a 40k version of the original strategy game when Games Workshop spend a lot of energy telling everyone theirs is the best. However the teaser and the animations look epic so for now I don’t really care.

And pay special attention to the bolters and heavy bolters when they fire. Because you can actually see the contrail of the bolt round’s rocket igniting. Which is pretty badass.

10 Years of Dawn of War

warhammerdowI was surprised to learn today that it’s been 10 years since the release of the original Dawn of War game. This auspicious occasion couldn’t be marked without a few words about a game that I not only invested hours of my life in but helped redefine the RTS genre.

When I first heard about the game I don’t mind saying that I was not optimistic. Up to then all the Games Workshop video games had been pretty shit. With the possible exception of the Space Hulk game on the Amiga and Commodore 64. Yes, I’m that old. Sod off. However as details began to emerge about gameplay – such as making use of hard and soft cover, as well as some semblance of a force organisation chart – I started to grow more positive.

Then I saw the graphics. Whilst it looks a little dated now, at the time they looked pretty sweet. The environment felt like the 41st Millennium. The Space Marines were a loyal representation. The animation was believable. And the finishing moves for each of the commanders was awesome. And best of all you could zoom right down into the action. Granted you needed a pretty meaty machine (10 years ago) to do that and it not crash but that was and is the joy of PC gaming.

When my copy arrived and I went through the lengthy install process then hit play. And I’m so very glad I did. The opening cut scene even now looks awesome. It bugs the living hell out of me because those few Orks could never take down a squad of Space Marines. And no sane Space Marine squad sergeant would allow his unit to meet a mob of Orks in open combat, but as I say, it looks awesome.

Actually it was awe inspiring. Those kinds of animations were rarely seen let alone in a Games Workshop computer game. Moreover it declared to the world that an animated Space Marine movie was possible. We’ve had one stab at it already and the fan made Lord Inquisitor on its way. One day… But the point is that it set imaginations on fire.

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The campaign was a little ropey in terms of plot and voice acting. It was caught in that classic trap of a publisher wanting it to be accessible to non-fans and a team of writers who knew the lore but couldn’t write very well. But well enough that the campaign trundled along quite happily albeit laboriously at times. I do confess to being quite glad it was over when I finished the final mission.

What it did do very well was encourage different styles of play and tactical decisions rather than the classic ‘build a base, build loads of blokes’ approach. Which whilst fun is never gonna win you the big scores in the press.

The game also introduced us to the Blood Ravens. A most intriguing bunch who I guessed from the get-go their true origins. A chapter that likes psykers and wears red and bone armour. Remind you of anyone? That aside, they’ve become a part of the 40k lore and I’ve seen many an army take to the table. Which I think is a benchmark of the game’s success. That it’s influencing hobby as well as the hobby influencing it.

That said, it was never the plot that made Dawn of War the game we know and love today. It was how faithfully the models had been lifted from the table and put into a PC game. No one had tried to be clever with the styling or reinvent the wheel. They looked like rendered models kicking the living shit out of each other and that was and is awesome. It was incredibly satisfying watching a tactical squad take apart a unit of Ork Boyz. And the first time a Land Raider rolled off the production line and opened up with its lascannons was a very special moment.

However, where the game got really fun was the skirmish mode. 4 players, either online or AI or both, racing to build a base and kick the living daylights out of each other. My online experiences were tarnished by people running a force commander into my base, calling down a lance strike to cripple my capacity to do, well, anything and then suffer the indignity of sitting and watching a single tactical squad slowly shoot the few buildings that survived to pieces. However, if you went up against an opponent that wasn’t a total bell end it was the best fun. And you could spend hours with the delicate dance of war.

One of my favourite memories was a game against a vastly superior player to me. He was out foxing me at every turn and it was only through sheer tenacity I was able to hold him back long enough to force a withdrawal. Up to this point I’d been putting my efforts into building a strike force so instead I put everything I had into building an overlapping defence network with a few Dreadnoughts in amongst there as well. By the time the inevitable attack came there were so many heavy bolter turrets opening up that entire secitons of the map weren’t visible. And by this point I had a few squads in reserve so once committed what was a holding action became a route and I was able to roll up his force and destroy his base. It truly was a superb game.

And that’s really the point. Dawn of War is a superb game. The supplements kept the game fresh and kept fans of the armies happy. Although I never completed the Winter Assault campaign. I just found using the Imperial Guard tedious. Which is exactly how I feel about using them on the board so they clearly got the feel for the army dead on.

It’s times like this that you realise how much you enjoyed something and the only reason you stopped playing was because you forgot you had it. It’s easy to blame time but the reality is that we all filled our days with new games like Dawn of War II – which I just couldn’t get on with – and left it on a shelf to collect dust and ultimately get sold on.

But for those that did sell on your copies – you fools! – you’re in luck. The lovely people over at Relic are doing a competition to celebrate Dawn of War’s anniversary by giving away a big pile of cool shit including the games. Head over to their site to find out how you could win.

And remember, only in death does duty end… Ugh.

-Phil

Ork Stormboyz – A Review

warhammer-40000-logoIt’s no secret that I’ve riding the green tide. It’s equally common knowledge that I’ve managed to cobble together 1,000 points already. None of it’s painted yet but that’s fine as the deal between myself, Mat & Lee is that we can’t progress past 1,000 points until it’s all painted. There’s an advantage to that though as it gives me time to get use to the army before it gets too big.

And one of my favourite parts of my budding Waaagh is the Stormboyz. What’s kinda fun for me, being part of the Old Guard, is I’ve had the luxury of watching these models change over the years and each time I thought ‘those are really cool’. They’ve just got better and better. And less fascist as well which is a good thing.

99120103020_StormboyzNEW01The thing that impresses me the most is the versatility of the kit. There are options enough that you can build 10 Stormboyz that all look different. Individuality in a horde army is rare so the luxury of coming up with different combinations is a bit of a treat. From the 10 I built my favourite is the Stormboy clutching stikbombz in both hands and one between his teeth. He looks completely mental.

I think what’s cool about the models is while the background points towards Stormboyz being disciplined and well-drilled, it’s still by Ork standards so they still have that shit kicker look that makes the Orks, as an army, look so cool. Instead of like the aforementioned fascists in grey jump suits ala the 2nd edition version. And they’re still Orks so they’re still giddy at the thought of unbridled death and destruction from above. And all that comes through on the models very well. Equally the rokkit packs are crude but have an elegant simplicity that – like the Dakkajet – points towards a barely understood higher knowledge of aerodynamics and the principles of sustained flight. The 3rd edition models had nothing more than an Acme rocket strapped to their back which would have achieved nothing more than firing its wearer high into the air only to plunge to their doom shortly after. Which, whilst funny, isn’t very believable even by 40k’s over stretched concept of the possible.

It also goes together very well. The legs and torso are attached so they’re far stronger than the older models, witch just the chest to attach. There’s also plenty of heads to choose from so you can mix and match between typical Ork heads of the zanier options like the ones shown above. Where possible opt for the zany ones. They’re just better. The only considerations when building the Stormboyz are:

Position the model towards the back of the base. Because the model is leaning forwards to simulate takeoff they’re very front heavy. Whilst this isn’t such a big problem as the old metal/plastic kits of yore they’ll still fall over and it’ll still be annoying.

The other is check all the rokkit pack parts fit together before you glue them. Whilst the vast majority are interchangeable, one or two aren’t and if it’s the last model you build in the squad you’ll be kicking yourself. Plus one or two of the nose cones will get in the way of one or two of the heads so glue that on last where possible.

Now there’s a few naysayers surrounding the use of Stormboyz primarily around their woeful armour save with no option to upgrade it. But I say this is a good thing because it encourages you to use them the way they were intended which is either with maximum aggression so you close the gap between your line and the enemy’s as quickly as possible, or you hold them back to act as a rapid response unit. Coupled with the fact that they’re relatively cheap compared to other jump infantry and they’re actually a pretty useful squad to have in the army.

Their high toughness will keep the Stormboyz safe from squishy targets like Imperial Guard when they make it in to contact, so the Ork’s low initiative isn’t so much of a problem. Against Space Marines it’s an entirely different matter but the sheer weight of attacks – and the aforementioned low-cost – will mean win or lose the Orks will always come out on top. In the game I played against Guard they made absolute mincemeat of everything they came into contact with and the addition of a Nob is brutal.

Of course that’s an ideal scenario. They were able to close rapidly and managed to avoid shooting or made it into cover when they couldn’t. The bottom line is they are very very vulnerable so there will be some games where they’ll be cut to ribbons before they do anything. How you use them so incredibly important. It’s kinda sucky from an investment point of view as a unit of 10 is the best part of £30.

If you can find ways to mitigate that all but pointless armour save then you have a very hard-hitting unit for naff all points. Time you attacks so they make contact with other elements of the army and Stormboyz have the potential to run roughshod thanks to the speed they have over their ground pounding counterparts. More so if you take a couple of units of 10.

Personally, I love the Stormboyz. The models are awesome and the best fun to build, just like the rest of the Ork models I’ve come across thus far. The level of customisation is pretty good and they just look the best when they’re built and all grouped together. They’re chunky though so be prepared for them to occupy a lot of space on the board – a bit of an issue for a horde army – and a lot of space in your figure case. But the bottom line is they’re great fun to use on the board.

Ork Stormboyz are available from Firestorm Games priced £13.95.

A Ghostly Apparition

 

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Guess who’s started a new army for 40k? It’s not my fault.  Honestly, blame Mat and Phil, they’re the ones who got me feeling all jealous and left out and stuff.  Once Phil followed Mat down the Xenos path it was only a matter of time before I caved and followed suit, which I duly did once I finally settled on an army to collect. In our gaming group Marine players feature heavily, 4 out of 7 to be exact, so when Mat decided to actually get a 40k army to play with (after selling his Tau) he figured collecting another Xenos force would be a good idea to help break up the monopoly – such a good idea in fact, that Phil and then I decided we would start new armies also of the non-good guy persuasion to add a bit of variety and eliminate those sometimes drab Blue on Blue games. Phil has now succumbed to the Green Menace to go alongside his near 10,000 points of Ultramarines, whereas I needed something to offer an alternative to the 3000+ point Marines, Guard and Grey Knights armies I already have – but I wasn’t sure what…

The new army feeling was building as I started to consider all the various races, but I found my choice somewhat more limited than I expected.  There are some I just won’t entertain – like Chaos for example. I know the whole Xenos army idea is supposed to move me out of my comfort zone but Marines with spikes stuck on them has never, ever, worked for me. Daemons lacked the things I like most in 40k – guns and vehicles, which also largely eliminates Tyranids for the same reasons.  Orks didn’t appeal to me and although Necrons may have, both were already taken.  The Tau were still good guys really and I’d already had an army of them in the past before selling them on, so I passed on taking them a second time.  The Dark Eldar were a strong option as there were a number of units/models I really liked but in the end not enough to build an army around, so that left just one non Imperial army to choose from – the Eldar. I’ve thought about collecting an Eldar army in the past, a few times in fact, as they suit my style of play and have some fantastic models, but their unit focus and squishiness always did enough to put me off.  However, the Iyanden Codex has offered me a way around this: a Ghost Warrior army! The new army feeling was well and truly buzzing now.

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An all Wraith Ghost Warrior army – 2000 points in 27 models!

‘Wraith’ type units really do have some cool looking models and nothing’s better than an army that can smash faces and look good whilst doing it. To go with that, one thing a Ghost Warrior army can never be accused of being is squishy, seeing as your standard Wraithguard troops have an impressive Toughness of 6! Add in your Wraithlords and Wraithknights with their Toughness 8 and things are looking pretty solid. However, with the sheer abundance of high strength and low AP weaponry floating around nowadays, Toughness 6 is not what it used to be and a 3+ Armour Save only takes you so far.  It was clear this army was not going to be a simple point and kill type outfit despite the tasty stat lines. Support would be essential but with the point costs being so very high it would be a hard balance to strike. Wraithguard are a costly 32 points each for something that’s still only 1 wound – plus another 10 if you want to give it a D-Scythe, meaning the army is going to be tiny. Like crazy tiny.  Like less than 20 models in a 1k army tiny. This is great news on the painting front as even I could get a whole army finished with that few models to paint in it, but it does concern me on the tactical side of things.  Phil recently stuffed almost 70 Orks into a 1k list and against a few handfuls of Wraithguard packing single shot (albeit mega powerful) guns with only a 12” range, getting overwhelmed is not only a possibility, it’s almost a certainty. They are going to need some serious rapid-firing back up, which is achievable, but breaks away a little from the pure Wraith army ideal.

The reasoning behind fielding a Wraith army in the first place is lack of manpower, so using vehicles which are piloted by just one or two Eldar to act as force multipliers makes perfect sense and opens up the tactical potential of the army – whilst still retaining its character. Including Wave Serpents is unavoidable as they’re the only transports Wraithguard can take and Warwalkers suit the aesthetic of the army as well providing the extra firepower so sorely needed – but with the Heavy Support section already looking crowded with the Wraithlords and Wraithknights taking up the slots there’s a strong possibility I’ll have to go unbound to make it work.  It’s disappointing they didn’t do a bit more for the Iyanden Codex, and something as simple as bumping Wraithlords into Elites would have made a true Wraith army more achievable with a choice in each force organisation slot (If you include Forgeworlds Wraithseer HQ – want!) – Marines get to do it with Dread’s so why not Eldar?  I’ll steer clear of everything else in the codex aside from the compulsory Seers – but there are a few things from Forgeworld which are really catching my eye. Wasps and Hornets look like they can provide all the extra firepower I need and both come under Fast Attack which would solve the overcrowded Heavy Support problem – letting me stay bound and qualifying for the all-important ‘Objective Secured’ rule.  The trade of a 5+ invulnerable for jump packs makes the Wasps even more fragile than the Warwalkers, but it’ll be fun bouncing them around the table shooting shit up while they last – especially if there’s a Wraithknight or two doing the same. I’m still worried about get swamped by horde armies, as is always the case with small elite armies, but it’ll be interesting getting the balance of the army right between guns and bodies.

FW Wasp
Wasp Assault Walker from Forgeworld

Painting wise, I’m undecided about whether to do the army in the yellow and blue of Iyanden as a few other colour schemes have also caught my eye. I was initially quite taken with the grey and orange of Yme Loc and as they have a rep for building titans, I thought this could translate onto my Adeptus Titanicus Eldar force.  But I have since realised the colours look far better on vehicles than they do on infantry, so I’m unsure how it will look on the abundance of long limbed walking units in the army. I could always do my own thing but that might slow things down and I’m promising to get the first 1000 points painted before I go any further.  Aaaahhh decisions. We moan, we wrangle, but we love ‘em really, it’s all part of that new army feeling.  Expect to hear of mighty Wraith constructs stomping on stuff real soon.

-Lee

Ork Bommer – A Review

warhammer 40000 logo

The Codex was largely responsible for me finally starting an Ork army but as I’ve always said time and again, you have to love the models you’re collecting or the project will simply never get finished. This is true or all armies in every game ever written. And it was true all those years ago when the Ork Bommer made its first appearance in Epic 40,000 16(ish) years ago. It was those models, along with the Thunderhawk gunship that sold me on that game. I loved the design, the haphazard nature of the construction and the ludicrously big bombs under the wings.

So when the Ork Bommer kit was released for Warhammer 40,000 I was delighted for Ork players the world over because they would know the same joy I did. Little did I realise that I would be in possession of one a year or two later.

When I decided to collect a Freebooter army I made the decision along with it that they needed to be the flashiest, wealthiest, gitiest Orks around and that meant more toys than anyone else and that means jets. It’s entirely possible I’m collecting a near useless army but it’ll look cool as it gets torn to pieces.

But on to the Bommer, or specifically the Dakkajet. I opted for the fighter over the bommer options because I like the idea of the Orks being flyboyz rather than psychopaths. They want to dominate the air and sow fear on the ground rather than fling themselves at it with far more ordnance than is sensible. It fits with my army theme that the pilots are Aces by Ork standards – aloof and skilled rather than kill junkies.OrkBommerNEW01

The kit is awesome. Providing you follow the instructions it goes together very easily. If you don’t then it’s a sodding pain as it goes together much like an Airfix kit so the fuselage is in two halves. This means if you don’t stick things in the right order you’ll be prising things apart. And much like an Airfix kit (other scale models are available) the fuselage will need to be to make sure all the joins take. Some parts a little thin so a prone to warping. It’s not a criticism as it’s a common enough problem with thin plastic, it’s just a word of warning when building the thing. Take the extra couple of minutes and make sure the joins have all taken.

Other than that it’s a pretty straight forward build with enough bits and bobs on the sprues that allow you to make some pretty distinctive planes should you choose to have more than one. Which of course you would. There’s a little bit of flexibility in the weapon load outs so you can move things around a bit but truth be told, without some snipping and clipping one Dakkajet will look much like any other which is kind of a shame, but something has to give considering the variety within the kit as a whole. And there’s nothing stopping you mixing it up with the parts available for a bit of variety. It’s more that the guns will be pretty much in the same place whether you like it or not.

What’s really awesome about the Bommer kit is that it speaks volumes about the Orks. Or specifically the knowledge hard-coded into the minds of Meks and the pilots. Its design is a lot like the MiG 19 with the intake in the nose and the swept back wings. It’s aerodynamic and features all the various bits and bobs a plane needs to fly. Granted the sophistication stops there as the intakes have spiky bits on them and the landing gear consists of a ski and a hook to bury in the ground. But hey, if it works… But it’s more like the Meks get bored or make do rather than don’t care about what they’re doing.

Basically it just builds and looks awesome.

In game terms there’s always going to be a divide when it comes to flyers. There are many who feel the rules are either vague or overpowered. Others – mainly the people who own flyers – like them just fine. Whilst I do think flyers can potentially dominate a game I have given the rules enough consideration because I never thought I’d take flyers so until I give the Dakkajet a shakedown I’m reserving judgement.

But there’s no getting round the fact that the between the special rules, armament and upgrades the Dakkajet – all the variants in fact – is a bit of a monster. You don’t get loads for you basic 110 points but the 3 upgrades – bringing to a still fair reasonable 150 points – gives you a base Ballistic Skill 3, an extra set of twin-linked super-shootas (making it 6, strength 6, AP 4 shots, re-rolling misses) and an extra roll to movement. Add in the Strafing Run special rule and you have a fast-moving Space Marine firing an assault cannon, minus the rending. That’s not bad. And if a Waaagh gets called that 6 shots goes up to 8 just to add insult to injury.

But for all that they’re still only armour 10 all round and Strength 6 isn’t going to do much against the majority of vehicles. That all changes with the other flyer variants equipped, as they are, with very large bombs. The Blitz Bommer is arguable better value being armed with two boom bombs. Whilst Strength 7 isn’t going to be blowing holes in Land Raiders, the AP 2 (and the large blast) will help to blow holes in terminators.

Although the fact that the pilot could be enjoying the diving part of his attack run so much that he’ll forget to do everything else (including pull up) is slightly off-putting. 135 points basic is a lot for what potentially could be a one use weapon. It’s very Orky and everything but I like my army to krump things rather than krump themselves.

The Burna Bommer is, of course, the middle ground for points but as you only get two missiles you’ll be buying another 4 jacking the price up massively. And they’re essentially heavy flamers you have to scatter. And as both bommer variants lose the strafing run rule their shooting will be far less effective as well. And overall the Dakkajet comes in about 10 points cheaper. And you’re probably better off taking a unit of burna boyz in a trukk for the good it’ll do you.

The point is this – the Dakkajet is weirdly the safe bet because it fires the most shots, for the least points and risk, with the greatest accuracy. Whilst it lacks the pyrotechnics of the other two it also doesn’t have the unpredictability of crashing into the ground or the bombs missing the targets altogether which would be the real kicker. It’s a great interference unit and will draw focus. If it eventually gets shot down it represents a fairly low outlay and will in most cases make its points back. Although if you’re using them right, the other two planes will as well.

Which ever your preference, it Ork flyers are unsubtle, relatively cheap, terrors of the sky and earth. And they look bloody cool whilst they do it. The kit is excellent fun and not overly complicated so it can be built within a couple of hours. Even if you don’t field it, it’s a kit worth owning just to wave it around and make ‘neow’ and ‘dakka dakka dakka’ noises.

The Ork Bommer is available from Firestorm Games priced £24.75 (and worth every zogging toof!)

 

Ork Trukk Boyz – A Review

warhammer-40000-logoI’ve been immersed in the Warhammer 40,000 Universe for a long time. First Space Crusade, then Epic, then Warhammer 40,000 itself. And although I’ve always been a staunch and loyal defender of the Imperium my eye has always wandered towards the Orks, the way teenager’s strays towards the part of the news stand that has all the boobies in it. Even when the Orks were square jawed green apes who couldn’t figure out how a trigger worked, I was oddly fascinated.

Never enough to collect them though. I didn’t own any Orks until Gorkamorka made its brief appearance and I bought what is, to this day, one of my favourite models ever – a metal Ork Nob.

img07180nmI did enjoy this brief foray into Orkishness and if I had more people to play than my brother, I probably would have properly got into Gorkamorka and eventually got an Ork army. But it wasn’t to be.

And so time wore on and with each iteration of 40k, so too were the Orks tweaked and improved. And whilst it’s the current Codex Orks that has swayed into collecting them (1,000 points and counting), it’s the models from 1998 that really began to fire my imagination.

And so I find myself in possession of some along with the Ork Trukk, the kit that hailed a huge design shift for Orks, away from the truly woeful Trukks and general square, blocky and characterless constructs of old.

It was the release of the Trukk that almost swayed me last time. Especially when Neil got one for his – then – fledging Ork army. Compared to the its older brother it was a real coup. Aside from being bigger, it actually felt like an Ork vehicle.

TrukkNEW01The Trukk is a superb kit. It’s a huge amount of fun to build – for the most part. And manages to feel Orky without being comical or like it’d never actually work in the ‘real world’. I love the fact that engine has a fan and belts (albeit they’ll be a sod to paint). There are drive shafts and a transfer box and everything which is way cool. And the dirty exhausts are probably my favourite but of the who engine. Can’t tell you why, they just look perfect on the model.

In some ways it reminds me of the Airfix kits I used to build before I plunged into fantasy and sci-fi realms and was never seen again. Just the way the kit builds up and gradually takes shape over time. My only gripe with the Trukk is that the cab is too small to fit the Orks in easily. It’s a huge pain to fit the driver in, even though it’s a nice touch that you can decide to make the Trukk a left or right hand drive. But I had to cut bits down and leave the awesome gear stick out to fit everything in. Now I’m a pretty bright guy, but even I couldn’t figure out how to make it all fit in with out brute force and prying pegs into position. And the gunner sits higher than the weapons mount that you’re supposed to glue him to. Which is pretty damn annoying. It forces you to have the gunner at a daft angle much like the image above.

Aside from that, the kit goes together beautifully and, excluding clipping and cleaning, went together in a bout half an hour. And I was actually a little bummed when I finished it because it was so much fun. It’s kinda nice to be starting a new army – especially one that needs as many models as Orks – and to enjoy building the basic transport as much as I did.

In game terms it’s just awesome. For 30 points you get a hefty weapon included with the option of upgrading to an even heftier weapon – a rokkit launcher – for free. And being open-topped, the Trukk makes for a very cheap Ork delivery system. With the speed vehicles can now move at it makes up for just being able to cram 12 Boyz in. And now that insufferable damage table has been removed I can take them guilt free. The new rule of being able to roll to offset penetrating damage is pretty handy and whilst does nothing to keep the vehicle alive for longer, it does prevent it from being immobilized or destroyed. Because those are the only two results that matter to an Ork player.

OrkBoyz10NEW01As I say, I’ve always liked the Ork Boyz models. And considering their age they look pretty sweet. And whilst the poses are a little stale compared to the newer models, considering you need bloody tonnes of them that’s not the end of the world. And the better news is that they go together quick. Forty-five minutes from clipping to built isn’t to be sniffed at. Again because you need tonnes of them that’s a huge labour savour.

The nice thing is that the decisions are limited to: Shoota Boyz or Slugga. Big Shoota or Rokkit Launcher. Power Klaw or Big Choppa. And that’s pretty much it. Poses are all but irrelevant as they’ll be one of two hundred on the Boyz by the time your army reaches the manly heights of 3,000 points. Space Marines it’s all about cool poses and injecting subtle but important nuisances of personality into the build. With Orks it’s all about conveying the level of krump someone will experience when the horde makes contact.

And they just go together so easily. Very little cleaning or trimming. You’ve got enough variety of heads and torsos that you can build 10 without them look too samey, but on the board they all look the same anyway, so don’t sweat. it.

Sixty points earn you a butt tonne of rampaging unpleasantness. As a life long Space Marine player I’ve always been pretty dismissive of Ork Boyz. Mainly because I know my army well and always try to be disciplined with fire patterns so when Orks do make contact they’ve been so badly whittled down that a Tactical Squad can break the back of the assault and send them packing. However, having played a game with the Orks – quite rare for me in early unit reviews – I can say that if you use Ork Boyz wisely, much like the Tactical Marine, you’ll never need go any place else for your stable source of misery.

The armour upgrade is pretty much essential which does make them a lot more expensive but the trade-off is survival. Marines will have to pour twice as many shots into the Orks to kill the same number they would normally and that just isn’t enough if the whole army is kitted out that way. It guarantees a healthy percentage of your Orks will make it into combat and krump things. And when you consider the Marines will be outnumbered 4:1 that’s pretty grim. There’s a case for just doubling up on the number of boyz you’ve got but that isn’t tenable in larger games and there’s also a financial element that can’t be ignored. The Boyz are a lot more expensive now than they were on release. Twice as expensive to be exact.

Whilst I was originally distracted by the oh-so-awesome Flash Gitz, Dakka Jet (review coming very soon) and the Gorka/Morkanaut in the Codex, I’ve found myself really surprised at the fighting effectiveness of these incredibly cheap basic troops. Four attacks each for Slugga Boyz is not to be sniffed at, for 6 points. Should a mob of 20 make contact that’s fist fulls of dice, which, let’s be honest, is one of the biggest appeals about fielding horde armies in the first place.

Whilst I accept they were only squishy Guard in the game I played, a unit of 10 Shoota boyz (so 1 less attack remember) tore a squad to pieces with attacks to spare. The squad then got hammered by shooting from a unit of Stormtroopers, a command HQ, and a Guard squad until only the Nob remained. Who then went about tearing apart the Guard squad on his own. Using an army gives you whole new respect for their potential as a fighting force over just playing against them. And whilst Orks and Ork Boyz have clear weaknesses – shonky BS and Initiative to name just two – it’s made up for in other ways. The cheapness and brute force being the obvious ones. Plus it’s quite liberating taking an army where you can be a bit more cavalier with casualties, but I found it made me play more aggressively which was to my benefit.

As a jumping off point into the weird and whacky world of Orks, the Trukk Boyz box is pretty much a must buy if for no other reason than you save a fiver. It gives the army some badly needed manoeuvrability either for the Boyz or another element of the force, and gives you the beginnings of that all important – and very potent – fighting core to your army. And whilst the two kits that make up the box aren’t the newest models in the range they are still as wonderfully Orky as anything else and no one should feel bad that the Ork Boyz weren’t updated in the latest round of releases.

The Trukk Boyz box is available from Firestorm Games priced £31.50
Ork Boyz are available from Firestorm Games priced £16.20 and the Trukk £20.25